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Japan|Independent Magazine: “Luncheon” with Editor-in-Chief, Frances von Hofmannsthal at Dover Street Market Ginza

Apr 23, 2019.Stephanie WuTokyo, JP
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Luncheon Magazine Editor-in-Chief, Frances von Hofmannsthal

Strolling through Dover Street Market Ginza (DSMG), you’ll see on the 4th floor a green circular newspaper kiosk which by the way, flew in all the way from London, shelved with stacks of the 7th issue of British magazine, Luncheon. Co-founded and co-edited by Thomas Persson (Creative Director) and Frances von Hofmannsthal (Editor-in-Chief) in 2016, the publication invites its audiences into intimate conversations. One that encompasses culture, sharing recipes, exchanging of ideas, fashion, etc. akin to a community get together. Releasing on a bi-annual rate, the independent titled magazine focuses on a rather timeless way of approach. Frances was there at the DSM event “OPEN HOUSE” that’s held almost three times a year to share some of her thoughts on her publication.  

“Long lunches nowadays are a luxury. But the simplicity in just coming together over a piece of bread, sharing different perspectives with different generations brings people together,” says Frances. “We’re spontaneous with who we interact with. There really isn’t ‘news’ apart from exhibitions or fashion.” The magazine is whimsical in the way sections are arranged in a menu: hors d'oeuvre appetizer, mains, classics, and so forth.

Independent magazines such as Luncheon, have a personality perchance. Many have various ways of approach such as their rich storytelling, as a specialist, advocating a lifestyle which some of the aims are not meant to be a profitable business. Is it because everything has become digitized that we need a remedy to slow down and digest other than being bombarded by the vast information created by the media norm? Engagement, something bespoke, or curated can be powerful tools for other businesses. According to Frances, Luncheon doesn’t plan on going digital and as it remains to create little fuss by establishing itself humbly. Speaking of which, their canvas bag large enough to fit their 27 by 38 centimeters magazine has pockets that would fit a wine bottle and baguette. Now this is a lunch I want to be at.

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